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LAUGHLIN PARK
 
 
city of waynesville, mo, missouri, laughlin park, waynesville city parkThe City of Waynesville Laughlin Park was donated by the Laughlin family in April 1971 in honor of Roy Laughlin, who was a local farmer.
 
Laughlin Park includes property that fronts the Roubidoux River and Roubidoux Spring.  As a spring fed river, the Roubidoux is one of the few rivers that the Missouri Department of Conservation stocks with both brown and rainbow trout.   Roubidoux Spring discharges approximately 37 million gallons per day, making it one of the top 20 springs in Missouri.
 
During the 1837-1839 Trail of Tears migration the area that is now Laughlin Park was used as a Cherokee encampment.  In 2006 the area was certified by the National Park Service as a site on the Trail of Tears  National Historic Trail.  Click here to read more on our Cherokee Encampment page.
 
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The City of Waynesville, Missouri, is located in Pulaski County, Missouri, and is home to Fort Leonard Wood.  Historic Route 66 winds its way through downtown Waynesville, and the area near the Roubidoux Spring in Waynesville's Laughlin Park was used as a Cherokee encampment during the 1837-1839 Trail of Tears march.